The Correspondence Chess Message Board

The Correspondence Chess Message Board (TCCMB) => New CC Player Area => Topic started by: Arjo Schreuders on September 02, 2018, 10:45:01 AM

Title: Useful hints and tips
Post by: Arjo Schreuders on September 02, 2018, 10:45:01 AM
Hi all! I started playing on ICCF a year ago after playing lots of games on a different site.
Im planning on taking on a few stronger opponents now (according to my new unfixed rating).
You guys have any useful hints and/or tips for me?!
I think I kinda have the basics down but there must be a few things Im not doing right or havent thought about ;)

Many thanks in advance!
Title: Re: Useful hints and tips
Post by: John Knudsen on September 02, 2018, 03:56:45 PM
Arjo,

Well, the most important thing I suppose is to have fun! :D

The higher up you go, the harder it will get. If I would be starting over, I would
take much more time on opening preparation. I would also absolutely understand that
everyone makes full use of computer software (this is not against the rules) and never
assume that there is a very big chance that any of my opponents will blunder.

I think it is also important to minimize your game load, and find that place where you feel comfortable,
in terms of the game load you can carry.

Blitz and serious correspondence chess can not co-exist with one another, in my humble opinion.

You can get an edge by studying your opponent's games, but be sure that they will be wanting to do the same.

Being the newbie, or underdog, in a tournament is a great thing! Expectations are low as to final performance
so there are many ways to outperform in tournaments if you are the underdog.

These are just the things that come to mind quickly...

John
Title: Re: Useful hints and tips
Post by: Michael Blake on September 07, 2018, 10:10:36 AM
Hi all! I started playing on ICCF a year ago You guys have any useful hints and/or tips for me?!

In my time playing I have probably made more mistakes than most but a quick list of my thoughts would include -
I hope that is of help. For me the big plus of correspondence play has been the friends that I have made alongside the opportunites to learn more about chess. I hope that you get as much enjoyment from the game as I have had.

Best wishes,
Mickey



Title: Re: Useful hints and tips
Post by: Arjo Schreuders on September 09, 2018, 03:28:26 PM
If I would be starting over, I would
take much more time on opening preparation.

What kinda opening preparation would you recommend?!
There are just so much sources... Seems almost impossible to do any concrete OP...
Title: Re: Useful hints and tips
Post by: John Knudsen on September 14, 2018, 11:08:51 AM
Hi Arjo,

I would spend a day looking over my future opponent's games (games archive at ICCF site) before the start date of the tournament.

What I am looking for is the type of game they like, those openings they play regularly. You can look for lines they previously played and did well with, and try to find a novelty which will throw them off. The idea behind this approach is that a player tends to repeat lines which have worked for them in the past - whether they are good or not. Another idea is to try and pick something to play, opening-wise, that they have not done well with. Lastly, you can try to play the opposite type of position that they like (i.e. if they like closed games try and open it up).

Watch out for "innovations" that have been played, but not thoroughly tested, in over the board master practice. I recently blindly played one such innovation that has been played in four master games, and, unfortunately, it had a one move refutation which gave me a losing position from the opening... There is little or no time pressure in correspondence chess!

Lastly, you can just play what comes natural to you, what you are comfortable with. This requires an overview of the current grandmaster theory and how it is doing in practice.

Any method that you use takes work and is time consuming.

John
Title: Re: Useful hints and tips
Post by: Arjo Schreuders on September 17, 2018, 03:08:18 PM
Lastly, you can just play what comes natural to you, what you are comfortable with. This requires an overview of the current grandmaster theory and how it is doing in practice.

Any method that you use takes work and is time consuming.

I think this is the best approach. If you play an opening you dont understand you can only just pick moves from your database or openingbook.

If you develop a feeling for an opening you can use your knowledge (double checked by your engine) to find new and/or better moves...